Publications

This presentation was delivered at Southern Cross University, Lismore, in April 2017 by Paul Barratt AO. It discusses how Australia goes to war, the case study of the 2003 Iraq war and what reforms are needed.

Wars are a major cause of the huge numbers of displaces people throughout the world. Australia has supported US military actions in Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria; actions which have in each case been a part of the armed violence that has forced so many people from their homes.

This 2-page colour flyer connects the dots between war powers reform and refugee rights, produced in April 2017.

The Federal Government conducted the first review of the Foreign Policy White Paper for 13 years. AWPR made a submission recommending legislation be introduced that, among other things, requires the deployment of Australian forces be debated and voted on by both Houses of Parliament.

This 6-page document was written and submitted in February 2017.

How are we doing? This update sets out our recent work on advocacy for war powers reform including our response to the Chilcot Report on the Iraq War, our parliamentary outreach and communications work.

This two-page flyer was produced in November 2016.

The Chilcot Report into the circumstances under which the UK became a party to the US-led invasion and occupation of Iraq in 2003 was released on July 6. It was prepared by Sir John Chilcot, took seven years to complete and ran to 12 volumes.

This one-page document contains 5 of AWPR’s key findings from the Chilcot Report, and was produced in August 2016.

Legislating for War Powers Reform – an AWPR Seminar

Australia urgently needs to change the war powers that allow troops to be committed to conflicts abroad whenever and for whatever reason a prime minister chooses.  The invasion of Iraq in 2003 was a catastrophe, with the decision for Australia’s involvement shrouded in secrecy and lack of  accountability.  By a similar undemocratic process, Australian forces are now re-deployed in Iraq and active in Syria.  The men and women of the Australian Defence Force deserve any proposal to send them to war to be exposed to much greater public scrutiny.

A growing number of Parliamentarians seek legislative change. To examine and support the process needed to bring it about, Australians for War Powers Reform (AWPR) held a seminar at ANU at which legal, defence, and international relations experts discussed the options.

You can download the executive summary and full report below.

Our book ‘How Does Australia Go To War?’ puts the government’s war powers under the microscope. The publication offers a diverse range of views from Australian experts in foreign affairs, defence, and law. It examines the history of Australia’s wars, compares what we do with other countries, and explores new and more democratic pathways to war powers reform.

It will be a valuable education resource for all concerned with policy, law, military and history, especially in this year marking the centenary of the ANZAC tradition.

Thank you to the following people who donated to help make the printing possible: David Stephens | Rosemary Margaret Nankivell | Michelle Farran | Peter Jones | David Miller | Carolyn Schofield | Janette McLeod | John Langmore | Lyn Stephens | Sue Wareham | Paul Barratt | Nick Deane | Peter Wesley-Smith | Cath Keaney | Vicken Babkenian | Felicity Ruby | Helen Bayes | Julie Kimber | Jo Errey | Alison Broinowski | Willy Bach | Julian Cribb | Judith Downey | Tom Sevil | Andrew Farran | Pera Wells | John G Phillips | Carolyn Stone | Ernest MacIntyre | Elspeth Hull | Helen Catelotti | Claudia Woodroffe | Dawn Emrys | Helen Christine Fisher | Michael McKinley | Chris O’Brien | Jim Kable | John M Courtney | Peter McCawley | Claudio Pompili | Suzanne Langker | Tognetti | Meredith Edwards | Michael and Gail Truter | Joy Storie | Helen Wornham | Richard Broinowski | Kellie Merritt | Bill Williams | Ruth Mitchell | Liz Tearii

This is the original publication of the Campaign for an Iraq War Inquiry.

The Campaign for an Iraq War Inquiry (CIWI) was originally launched in 2012 with a publication outlining the key arguments for an inquiry into Australia’s involvement in the 2003 Iraq War. This publication can be downloaded in full booklet below.